Cell Symposia: Human Evolution

Cell Symposium: Evolution of Modern Humans - From Bones to Genomes
March 16 - 18, 2014, Hotel Meliá, Sitges, Spain

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Keynote Speaker

Matt Ridley

Confirmed Speakers

Ofer Bar-Yosef, Peabody Museum, Harvard University, USA
Anna DiRienzo, University of Chicago, USA
Wolfgang Enard, Ludwig-Maximilans University Munich, Germany
Tecumseh Fitch, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
Lluis Quintana-Murci, Institut Pasteur, France
Jean-Jacques Hublin (Organizer), Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
Mathias Jakobsson, Uppsala University, Sweden
Elinor K. Karlsson, Harvard University FAS Center for Systems Biology, USA
Kevin Laland, University of St. Andrews, UK
Carles Lalueza-Fox (Organizer), Institut de Biologia Evolutiva, Barcelona, Spain
John Novembre, University of Chicago, USA
Svante Pääbo, Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
Mark Pagel, Reading University, UK
Chris Stringer, Natural History Museum, London, UK
Cliff Tabin, Harvard University, USA
Sarah Tishkoff, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Tim Weaver, University of California, USA
Eske Willerslev, Copenhagen University, Denmark

Organizing Committee

Florian Maderspacher, Senior Editor, Current Biology
Paul Craze, Editor, Trends in Ecology and Evolution
Carles Lalueza-Fox (Organizer), Institut de Biologia Evolutiva, Barcelona
Jean-Jacques Hublin, Max-Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig

How did our species, Homo sapiens, become what it is today? How did our ancestors spread across the globe? How did their bodies and minds evolve?

The study of these fascinating questions has seen a veritable revolution in recent years: genome sequencing of ancient and extant humans, and their relatives, has revealed our evolutionary history in unprecedented detail and sheds light on how humans adapted; new analyses of fossils and archaeology reveal what makes humans so unique.

Our Cell Symposium ‘Evolution of Modern Humans — From Bones to Genomes’ pays homage to this revolution by bringing together an uniquely broad mix of world-class researchers who study the evolution of our species from various angles — from palaeoanthropology to genetics, genomics and archaeogenetics, through to the study of cultural and cognitive processes. This meeting will synthesize our current picture of the evolution of modern humans and formulate the most exciting questions for future research.

Session Topics:

  • Human genetics and genomics
  • Adaptation
  • Archaeogenetics
  • Palaeoanthropology
  • Cognition and culture

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Supporting Publications

Supporting Publications - Cell

Supporting Publications - Cell

Supporting Publications - Cell

Supporting Publications - Cell

Supporting Publications - Cell